PREVENTION AND DISSOLUTION EFFECTS OF SANG SARMAHI ON CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS INDUCED BY GLYOXALATE TREATMENT IN RATS

  • Ali akbar shah Indus Medical College
  • Fatehuddin Khand
  • Mumtaz Ali Memon
  • Abdullah G. Arijo
Keywords: Litholytic, Antiurolithic, Calcium oxalate, crystals, Sang Sarmahi

Abstract

Background: Development of cost-effective therapy for safe removal of kidney stones is very much desired. The purpose of this study was to evaluate litholytic and anti-urolithic effects of Sang sarmahi on calcium oxalate crystals induced by glyoxalate treatment in rats. Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five equal groups; A, B1, B2, C1 and C2. Group A rats were untreated and served as negative controls. The rats in groups B1 and B2 after induction of calcium oxalate crystals were respectively given placebo and Sang sarmahi treatment and served as positive control and curative groups. The rats in groups C1 and C2 were simultaneously administered   glyoxylate+placebo, and glyoxylate+Sang sarmahi treatments and respectively served as positive controls and preventive group. Serum samples of rats in groups A, C1 and C2 were measured for the levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, calcium, magnesium, oxalate and creatinine. Similarly, left kidney tissue homogenates of rats in groups A, B1 and B2 were analyzed for the levels of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase. Histological slides of right kidney sections of all 30 rats were prepared for microscopic examination. Results: Histological examination of renal tissue sections showed that Sang sarmahi failed to prevent crystallization in kidneys of groups B and C rats. No significant differences were seen in serum and tissue homogenate parameters between positive controls and Sang sarmahi treated rats of both prevention and curative groups. Conclusion: Sang sarmahi failed to exhibit any significant litholytic and anti-urolithic activity.

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Published
2018-08-20
How to Cite
1.
shah A, Khand F, Memon M, G. Arijo A. PREVENTION AND DISSOLUTION EFFECTS OF SANG SARMAHI ON CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTALS INDUCED BY GLYOXALATE TREATMENT IN RATS. PJP [Internet]. 20Aug.2018 [cited 10Dec.2018];14(3):21-4. Available from: https://pjp.pps.org.pk/index.php/PJP/article/view/176