ROLE OF SELF-TALK IN PREDICTING DEATH ANXIETY, OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER, AND COPING STRATEGIES IN THE FACE OF COVID-19 AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

Authors

  • Iqra Safdar Rapha International University, Islamabad, Pakistan
  • Ifat Gulab Postgraduate College for Women, Haripur, Pakistan
  • Nighat Gul Govt: Girls Degree College No. 2, University of Haripur, Pakistan

Keywords:

COVID-19, OCD, YBOCI, CSISF, DAS, STS

Abstract

Background: The current study examines, the role of self-talk in death anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and coping strategies faced during COVID-19 by university students. The study was conducted among university students after COVID. Method: This study included 300 university students, living within the zones of Haripur, Pakistan. They participants were chosen using purposive sampling technique. The self-talk scale (STS), coping strategies inventory short form (CSISF), death anxiety scale (DAS), and Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (YBOCS) were utilized for assessment. Information was analysed with Student’s t-test and simple linear regression. Results: The female students significantly scored higher on STS, DAS, and CSISF, while male students scored higher on YBOCS. The regression test indicated that self-talk was a significant predictor of coping strategies and death anxiety among university students. Conclusion: Self talk was the predictor of death anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder and copying strategies during COVID-19 outbreak among students gender wise

Pak J Physiol 2024;20(1):48-51

 

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Author Biographies

Iqra Safdar, Rapha International University, Islamabad, Pakistan

MS Student, Psychology

Ifat Gulab, Postgraduate College for Women, Haripur, Pakistan

Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology

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Published

31-03-2024

How to Cite

1.
Safdar I, Gulab I, Gul N. ROLE OF SELF-TALK IN PREDICTING DEATH ANXIETY, OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER, AND COPING STRATEGIES IN THE FACE OF COVID-19 AMONG UNIVERSITY STUDENTS . Pak J Phsyiol [Internet]. 2024 Mar. 31 [cited 2024 Jun. 13];20(1):48-51. Available from: https://pjp.pps.org.pk/index.php/PJP/article/view/1524